WWF-Philippines

Stories

With your help, we can build a future where both humans and nature thrive. These are some of our conservation highlights.

The FIgures

With your support, we are able to reach these conservation and education milestones.

Boat
1000
Fibreglass Boats
Figure 1
Through Bancas for the Philippines, fisherfolk affected by Typhoon Yolanda were able to build climate-smart boats to help them return to the sea for food and livelihood.
Whale Shark
469
Whale Sharks
Figure 2
WWF works with the local government of Donsol to promote sustainable whale shark ecotourism. A total of 469 whale sharks have been recorded inside the bay since 1998.
Students
700,000
People
Figure 3
We conduct Environmental Education (EE) sessions in public and private schools around the country to hone responsible citizens who care for the planet. To date, more than 700,000 individuals have been taught.
Tamaraw
405
Tamaraws
Figure 4
WWF’s presence in Mindoro has strengthened the protection of this critically-endangered animal. Tamaraw numbers are now growing steadily.

THE PHILIPPINES

WWF-PHILIPPINES PROJECTS

Our projects are spread throughout the country. Aside from protecting and conserving these areas, we teach people sustainable forms of livelihood to benefit both themselves and the environment.

Projects in the Philippines
close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (General Santos City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Davao City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Zamboanga City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (CDO City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Butuan City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Puerto Princesa)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Tacloban City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Cebu City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Iloilo CIty)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Naga City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Batangas City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Angeles City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Dagupan City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Baguio City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (Santiago City)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts (16 Cities)

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc.

 

WWF-Philippines and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) Foundation, Inc. have embarked on a four-year, 16-city study which highlights opportunities for businesses and local government units to capitalize on climate adaptation. The study, titled Business Risk Assessment and the Management of Climate Impacts, analyzes economic and climate trends while predicting probable scenarios. The study aims to help city planners and decision-makers assess climate change impacts, identify opportunities and sustainability strategies for cities to retain economic viability and competitiveness in a climate-defined future.
 

The project commenced in 2011 and is set to be completed by 2015. Below are the cities covered by the study:

 

  • A. Laoag City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • B. Santiago City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • C. Baguio City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • D. Dagupan City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • E. Angeles City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • F. Batangas City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • G. Naga City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • H. Iloilo City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • I. Cebu City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • J. Tacloban City (Phase 3, 2013)
  • K. Puerto Princesa City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • L. Butuan City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • M. Cagayan de Oro City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • N. Zamboanga City (Phase 2, 2012)
  • O. Davao City (Phase 1, 2011)
  • P. General Santos City (Phase 4, 2014)
  • Click here to read more

 

close [X]

El Nido, Palawan

Ecotourism

 

From 1999 to 2000, WWF-Philippines prepared baseline studies for the development of the General Management Plan of the El Nido-Taytay Managed Resource Protected Area and the Comprehensive Land / Water Use Plan of El Nido. Enforcement actions started in 2001 resulting in seizures, apprehensions, fines and cases filed. The multi-sectoral effort in El Nido is regarded as a model in inter-sectoral collaboration, enforcement innovations and public-private partnerships. 

Today, WWF-Philippines is involved in the planning process for a Tourism Master Plan, which will be embedded into the new and updated Comprehensive Land Use Plan of this booming tourist town known for its pristine turquoise waters and towering karst limestone islets. The new Tourism Master Plan seeks to manage tourism expansion in order to mitigate its impacts on the El Nido ecosystem.

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Sustainable Tuna Fisheries Management Mamburao

Mamburao, Occidental Mindoro

WWF is spearheading tuna-trade initiatives in Mamburao, one of the largest remaining tuna fisheries in the country. The first batch of fresh, chilled and loined Mamburao-caught tuna with catch certificates was sent to Europe in 2012. 

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Sustainable Tuna Fisheries Lagonoy Gulf

Lagonoy Gulf, Bicol Region (Camarines Sur and Albay)

In the face of large-scale commercial fishing and depleted stocks, the handline tuna fishermen of Lagonoy Gulf can still dream of a better life, thanks to institutionalized support for their traditional ways. WWF works with the local government and private funders who are investing in Lagonoy Gulf’s fisheries to develop a new and sustainable source of tuna. In the process, handline fishermen are getting a boost to their livelihoods, as well as institutionalized encouragement to carry on with their age-old fishing customs. 

WWF’s work in Lagonoy Gulf is under the Partnership Programme Towards Sustainable Tuna (PPTST). 

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Western Mindoro Integrated Conservation Program

West Mindoro Integrated Convervation Program

Mts. Iglit-Baco Mountain Range

 

 

To support the conservation of both the Tamaraw (Bubalus mindorensis) and its productive mountain habitats, WWF-Philippines partnered with the Far Eastern University (FEU), Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), Western Mindoro Integrated Conservation Program (WMICP), Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute (HSWRI), local government of Occidental Mindoro, plus the indigenous Tawbuid Batangan Mangyan inhabitants of Mts. Iglit-Baco for an ambitious goal – to double wild Tamaraw numbers from 300 to 600 by 2020.

An estimated 10,000 Tamaraw once roamed the island of Mindoro in the 1900s. However, a crippling outbreak of Rinderpest in the 1930s, widespread land clearing, plus trophy hunting drove the species to the brink of extinction. By 1969, the population plummeted to less than 100 heads, all holding out atop the grassy slopes and forest patches of Mts. Iglit, Baco, Aruyan, Calavite and Halcon. Owing largely to local government conservation efforts, the population has recovered to 345 heads as of April 2013 and continues to rise yearly.

Iglit-Baco Mountain Range, Occidental Mindoro

The world's Tamaraw (Bubalus mindorensis) population dropped by 97% within the last century. With only a few hundred remaining, swift action is needed to save these wild dwarf buffalo from extinction.

In 2012, WWF-Philippines partnered with the Far Eastern University and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources for a programme called Tams-2, which seeks to double fragmented and little studied Tamaraw populations from 300 to 600 by 2020. From an initial count of 153 in 2001, the latest visual count of this endemic species was 345 in 2013.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has classified this Philippine dwarf buffalo as critically endangered – the highest risk rating for any plant or animal species. The Tamaraw is endemic to the Philippines, foraging up and down Mts. Iglit, Baco, Aruyan, Halcon and Calavite in Mindoro. The Tamaraw can be differentiated from the Carabao (Bubalus bubalis carabanensis) through its distinctive V-shaped horns, a shorter tail, and a shaggy coat of chocolate to ebony fur. Adults stand four feet tall and weigh an average of 300 kilograms.

WWF-Philippines and FEU's Western Mindoro Integrated Conservation programme ties in Tamaraw research and improved park management initiatives with existing efforts to conserve Apo Reef and the rich marine habitats off the coast of Sablayan. Behavioural studies are underway with the deployment of camera traps in the Iglit-Baco mountain range, a precursor to future deployments in other sites to monitor and validate the existence of remnant Tamaraw populations beyond the Iglit-Baco mountain range.

close [X]

Return of the Giants: Whale Sharks in Donsol

Whale Sharks in Donsol 

For years, Donsol in the Philippine province of Sorsogon has been identified as a whale shark hotspot – hosting one of the largest aggregations of whale sharks on Earth. Other large aggregations include Ningaloo Reef in Australia, Mexico, and Mozambique.

Through continued partnership with the Donsol local government and key tourism stakeholders, top environmental solutions provider World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF-Philippines) implements a Community-based Whale Shark Ecotourism Program to sustainably manage whale shark interactions. The initiative also aims to generate a better understanding of the country's migratory and resident whale shark population.

close [X]

Teresa, Rizal

Teresa, Rizal

Water and Watershed Programmes

 

The Morong Watershed is bounded on the north by the city of Antipolo, to the south by the Central Bay of Laguna Lake, to the east by the municipalities of Baras and Tanay, and the west southwest by Binangonan, Angono and Cardona. Like other watersheds, the Morong Watershed is experiencing increasing pressure from development interventions. These are stressing the watershed's natural environment and land base as well as community services.

In partnership with Lafarge Philippines, WWF-Philippines is studying the Morong Watershed to develop a Flood Simulation Model, to update existing water Supply and Demand data, to assess the vulnerability and impact of a sampling of wells, and to develop a strategic framework and action plan for Morong Watershed through a multi-stakeholder planning process.

close [X]

Sta. Rosa, Laguna

Sta.Rosa Laguna

Water and Watershed Programmes

 

The Santa Rosa watershed is reeling from the impacts of urbanization and industrialization. Rapid population growth, intensive land development and landscape changes have reduced its natural capacity to retain water and hold rainfall during rainy days. This has often resulted in large-scale flooding, water pollution and groundwater scarcity. WWF-Philippines implemented a five-year programme to assist local stakeholders in managing their watershed zones.

By enhancing the capacities of stakeholders with official mandates in formulating and implementing watershed policies, the water resources of the Santa Rosa Watershed and nearby Laguna de Bay can be better managed.

The City of Santa Rosa offers a good example of an LGU which completed the policy cycle through the formulation of its own Environmental Code. Innovative provisions were introduced such as flood-neutral land development, flood and sewage master plans, groundwater management through partnerships and participatory water governance. The Clean Water Act of 2004 offers the way forward in terms of institutional mechanisms through the Governing Board and formulation of the Integrated Water Resources Management Plan, where water quality management is subsumed. Plans and governing structures have been crafted for the Santa Rosa watershed. For LLDA, the Santa Rosa project provides a template for future replication throughout the Laguna Lake basin. The Hydrologic Atlas for Laguna de Bay was published to standardize hydrological data throughout the Laguna Lake region and provide a sound scientific basis for policy formulation. This is the first step in a long process. Success and continuity will be contingent on LLDA working closely with the watershed LGUs in moving this process forward.

close [X]

Tamaraw Conservation

Western Mindoro Integrated Conservation Program

Mts. Iglit-Baco Mountain Range

To support the conservation of both the Tamaraw (Bubalus mindorensis) and its productive mountain habitats, WWF-Philippines partnered with the Far Eastern University (FEU), Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), Western Mindoro Integrated Conservation Program (WMICP), Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute (HSWRI), local government of Occidental Mindoro, plus the indigenous Tawbuid Batangan Mangyan inhabitants of Mts. Iglit-Baco for an ambitious goal – to double wild Tamaraw numbers from 300 to 600 by 2020. 

An estimated 10,000 Tamaraw once roamed the island of Mindoro in the 1900s. However, a crippling outbreak of Rinderpest in the 1930s, widespread land clearing, plus trophy hunting drove the species to the brink of extinction. By 1969, the population plummeted to less than 100 heads, all holding out atop the grassy slopes and forest patches of Mts. Iglit, Baco, Aruyan, Calavite and Halcon. Owing largely to local government conservation efforts, the population has recovered to 345 heads as of April 2013 and continues to rise yearly. 

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Bud Bongao, Tawi-Tawi

Bud Bongao, Tawi-Tawi

Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) Programme

 

 

Bud Bongao is one of the last remaining moist forests of the Sulu Archipelago Biogeographic Zone. The protection of Bud Bongao is considered extremely urgent not only among conservation scientists and workers but also by the people living around the mountain, along with government and non-government stakeholders. The spiritual and traditional importance of Bud Bongao to the Sama people adds to its value and the need for protection. Advancing threats raises the urgency of the situation.

Threats generally stem from the rapidly increasing population and the need for land to develop. Tawi-Tawi has long been the refuge of in-migrants from the restive islands of the Sulu Archipelago. Its relative calm and surging economy, propelled by seaweed mariculture and proximity to the more prosperous Malaysian state of Sabah makes it an attractive destination. The expanding population spawned the consequent expansion of cultivated areas and settlement, higher land values resulting from urbanization and the diversification of the ethnic composition, which dilutes the cultural and religious values that have long shielded Bud Bongao from destruction.

As a response to this, the project was able to facilitate the formulation of a management plan for both Bud Bongao and the adjoining forest area of Bud Kabugan. A management structure and body nestled in the Municipal government of Bongao has been emplaced to pave the way for a locally-managed protected area with the participation of local stakeholders. The formulated management plan is now under consideration by the municipal council. It is hoped that the plan shall be translated into official policy.

 

close [X]

Abuan Watershed, Isabela

Agroforestry and Watershed Management

Northern Sierra Madre Mountain Range

The goal of this project is to enhance the resiliency of communities and watersheds in the Abuan watershed against the worsening impacts of climate change. The project identified risks from floods and droughts due to the extensive damage caused by past events. Risks are exacerbated by massive deforestation due to upland migration, land conversion, poaching and infrastructure development. The affected human population within the watershed numbers 15,000 and consists of 3000 families covering 13 barangays. The main strategies are building and enhancing the capacities of mandated institutions such as the Local Government Unit of Ilagan City and the Cagayan Valley Integrated Agriculture and Research Center (CVIARC), an attached agency to the Department of Agriculture.

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

The Tubbataha Reefs

Ecotourism

Tubbataha Reefs and Cagayancillo, Palawan

The Tubbataha Reefs Natural Marine Park lies at the apex of the Coral Triangle, the global center of marine biodiversity. Tubbataha stands out as the best-managed offshore Marine Protected Area in the country. Whereas a typical square kilometer of healthy coral reef generates about 40 metric tonnes of seafood yearly, Tubbataha produces upwards of 200 metric tonnes. Protecting this 97,030-hectare marine enclave means safeguarding both our national heritage and a food source for future generations. 

WWF-Philippines and the Tubbataha Management Office have established practical systems to sustain operations: diver fees, ‘no-take’ zones and the expansion of park boundaries are dramatically increasing marine biomass. Sustainable ecotourism, mariculture and microfinance have been the primary thrusts for the neighbouring municipality of Cagayancillo. 

Today, WWF-Philippines is leading efforts to build a new Tubbataha Ranger Station to upgrade the current facility, which has served the country for decades. A new Ranger Station will allow Park Rangers to handle mounting threats like climate change impacts, poaching, illegal fishing expeditions, and grounding incidents. WWF-Philippines is also helping the TMO establish its endowment fund to make it self-sufficient for decades to come. 

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Tawi-Tawi, ARMM

Mariculture Management and Marine Conservation

Tawi-Tawi

hrough the support of Government and Aid Agencies (GAAs) such as the Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau of the DENR, the Global Environment Facility and the United Nations Development Programme, WWF-Philippines has established the New Conservation Areas in the Philippines Project in Tawi-Tawi, the southernmost Philippine province. The European Union is also WWF-Philippines’ partner in the implementation of a Population, Health, and Environment Program. 



Click here to read more

close [X]

Sustainable Live Reef Fish Trade

Sustainable Fisheries Management and Live Reef Fish Trade

The towns of Taytay, Araceli, and Quezon in Palawan

Fisheries management plans were developed for the three municipalities focusing on Live Reef Fish management. Policy improvements on fisheries management as well as establishment of new Marine Protected Areas in Taytay and Araceli were the results of various coral, fisheries, policies and income profiling surveys in these areas. Training sessions were also conducted on LRF management and environmental law enforcement while a Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) plan was developed for Taytay, Palawan.
 

In the town of Quezon, WWF implements reef fisheries management, market accessibility for sustainably-produced marine resources, certification and capacity-building. 

Click here to read more

 

 

close [X]

Apo Reef, Occidental Mindoro

Coastal Resource Management and Climate Change Adaptation

Apo Reef and Sablayan, Occidental Mindoro

Apo Reef is the largest non-contiguous reef in Asia and is situated 15 nautical miles west of Sablayan in Occidental Mindoro. It is home to almost 200 species of hard coral, 385 species of fish plus charismatic undersea giants like thresher and hammerhead sharks, manta rays, sperm whales, dolphins and sea turtles. 

Through the DENR and the local government of Occidental Mindoro, WWF helped secure the future of Apo Reef through its proclamation as a ‘no-fishing’ zone in 2007. Overall coral growth dwindled to less than 33% in 1994 but has steadily improved. In 2006, an assessment cited growth at 52% and rising. 

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Donsol, Sorsogon

Ecotourism and Species Conservation Program

Donsol, Sorsogon

Since 1998, WWF-Philippines has been assisting the local government of Donsol in conserving its whale sharks(Rhincodon typus) through the development of a community-based ecotourism scheme and coastal resource management program. Their fifth class municipality is now first class – and whale shark ecotourism is now among the Bicol Region's most popular tourist activities – even cited by TIME Magazine as the best animal encounter destination in Asia. 

The ecotourism industry has significantly increased local community income and is a prime example of how both economic and conservation goals can be met. Current initiatives concentrate on implementing a community-based ecotourism program and fisheries management plan, identifying individual sharks and migration routes through state-of-the-art satellite tagging and photo-identification. 

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Hamilo Coast, Batangas

Coastal Resource Management and Ecotourism

Hamilo Coast, Nasugbu, Batangas

Strong allies since 2007, WWF-Philippines and Hamilo Coast continue to maintain the cleanliness and beauty of the development’s 13 coves and inland watersheds. The two have embarked on various sustainability and environmental initiatives like the declaration of select Hamilo Coast coves as Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), the deployment of Bantay Dagat units to protect the area from illegal fishermen and the cultivation of true giant clams(Tridacna gigas) in Santelmo Cove. 
WWF-Philippines has also helped Hamilo Coast establish ridge-to-reef management, waste management, and renewable energy solutions. A model for every ecotourism development in the Philippines, the partnership is an indicator that there can be development without seriously harming the environment. 

Click here to read more

 

close [X]

Davao Gulf / Island Garden City of Samal

Climate Change Adaptation and Ecotourism

Samal Island and Davao Gulf

 

On the Island Garden City of Samal (IGACOS), WWF-Philippines is implementing a four-year climate change adaptation project which aims to increase the resilience of coastal ecosystems to the mounting impacts of climate change. WWF-Philippines conducts vulnerability assessments involving key stakeholders, developing an innovative methodology to improve the resilience of protected areas, capacity building, as well as the preparation of training materials and tools for local and regional adaptation planning. To influence international policy negotiations, project results and outputs are to be shared and promoted locally and internationally.

Click here to read more. Click here to watch the video.

 

close [X]

Sustainable Tuna Fisheries Pasuquin

Sustainable Tuna Fisheries Management

Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte

Tuna remains the country’s top seafood export. At present, the country’s small-scale tuna fishing industry faces various challenges. It is important to strengthen artisanal tuna fisheries through responsible practices, strong partnerships among stakeholders, adequate management planning and guidance to transform small-scale fisheries to stay at par with international sustainability and equitability standards. 

In the town of Pasuquin in Ilocos Norte, WWF helps improve local fisheries management and ensures the sustainability of the small-scale tuna handline industry. Handline fishing is a traditional and environmentally-sound method of catching large tuna species like Yellowfin(Thunnus albacares) and Bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus)through the use of a single hook. 

The project is another way of reducing the massive strain brought about by commercial fisheries to the country’s marine resources. 

The program – a collaboration between WWF-Philippines, the local government of Pasuquin, the Ilocos Norte provincial government, local fishing groups and the private sector – proves that local nonprofits, the corporate fishing sector, and local communities can work as one to provide critical solutions to marine conservation challenges. 



Click here to read more.

GET IN TOUCH WITH US

We would love to hear from you! Feel free to contact us through any of the details listed below.

WWF–Philippines Headquarters

4th Floor JBD Plaza #65 Mindanao Ave.
Barangay Bagong Pag-asa,
Quezon City 1105 Philippines

Tel: +632 920 79 23/26//31
Fax: +632 426 3927
Email: kkp@wwf.org.ph

NEWSLETTER SIGN UP

×

CONNECT WITH US